Monday, November 12, 2012

Provisioning Rules From The Boat Galley

Whether you are a cruiser or only go on an occasional overnight escape, The Boat Galley has the best provisioning tips for boaters...

Tips From The Boat Galley
By Carolyn Shearlock, author of The Boat Galley, with over 350 FREE articles to get the most out of your boat kitchen with galley tips, insights & equipment recommendations. A few recipes, too - plus an active Facebook community to ask questions and share tips with other readers! The Boat Galley Cookbook, written with Jan Irons, is now available at Amazon and other retailers.

This week Carolyn Shearlock of The Boat Galley explores and explains...

The Second Rule of Provisioning
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Provisioning

If the first rule of provisioning is to try one before buying a large stock of something, the second rule has to be not to think that you'll eat differently on board than you have ashore. Seriously, your tastes just aren't going to change that much.

By that, I mean that if you've always liked salad and hated canned vegetables, don't stock up on the canned spinach and neglect any sort of salad. You'll only hate your meal choices.

True, you may need to find variations on some things. To continue the above example, lettuce doesn't last too long as the motion of the boat quickly bruises it. But cabbage lasts well and you can make all sorts of good cabbage salads (there are a dozen in The Boat Galley Cookbook) - it doesn't have to be the same thing every day!  And instead of heating up that canned spinach, think about using a can of green beans as the base for a salad.

Similarly, if having a cup of good coffee has always been part of your morning ritual, don't think that you're going to suddenly switch to using instant coffee and be happy about it. You may want a small jar of instant for patches of rough weather, but get the good stuff and a coffee maker that will work on the boat.

If you've always been lukewarm at best about a tuna sandwich, don't decide that's what you're going to have for lunch every day just because it's easy to stow a case of tuna. You won't eat it. You'll rummage around and come up with something else to eat.

Admittedly, it's easier to take cans of beer on the boat than bottles of wine. But if you've never liked beer, you're not going to be too happy when it comes time for a sundowner even if you do have a gorgeous view of the harbor.

If you think something might be a good food on the boat and it's different from what you normally eat, go back to Rule #1 and try one first. You may find a new favorite. And you may not . . . but at least you won't be stuck with a month's supply!

Storage space on a boat is precious (and so is your food budget). Don't waste it on food that you won't eat.


About the Author

Carolyn Shearlock is author of The Boat Galley, with over 350 FREE articles to get the most out of your boat kitchen with galley tips, insights & equipment recommendations. A few recipes, too - plus an active Facebook community to ask questions and share tips with other readers! The print edition of The Boat Galley Cookbook, written with Jan Irons, is now available from Amazon and other retailers - electronic editions are coming but slightly delayed.


Photos by Carolyn Shearlock.

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